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An Autonomous Archive of the Unseen: Post-Museum’s “Bukit Brown Index” Project
無主之地的自治檔案:後博物館的《武吉布朗索引》計劃
September 17th, 2020Type: Interview
Author: Rikey Tenn , Woo Tien Wei, Jennifer Teo Editor: Rikey Tenn
Note: Post-Museum is a Singaporean collective co-founded by Jennifer Teo and Woon Tien Wei in 2007. Their work examines urban contemporary life and explores how inhabitants can critically and actively engage with the city as more than a mere place. Until 2011, Post-Museum operated an eponymous independent space which hosted artistic and socio-cultural projects, workshops and exchanges. Currently nomadic, their practice is rooted in curatorial, social and spatial concerns, and similarly, takes different forms from installations to events and research, and extends to social practice. Post-Museum has exhibited locally and abroad, including in Japan, China, South Korea and Malaysia, amongst others. They live and work in Singapore.
Post-Museum, “Lessons Amongst Trees” (2017) in 2019 Madou Sugar Industry Triennial; photo courtesy of artist
Post-Museum, "Bukit Brown Index #132: Triptych of the Unseen" (2018) in 2019 Singapore Biennale; photo courtesy of artist
Post-Museum, "The Bukit Brown Index" (2014-) in Unearthed; photo courtesy of artist
Post-Museum, "Bukit Brown Index #132: Triptych of the Unseen" (2018) in 2019 Singapore Biennale; photo courtesy of artist
Woon Tien Wei, A Screenshot for Sew Workshop (2020); image courtesy of artist
Footnote
[1] The collective p-10 in the beginning: Charles Lim, Lee Sze Chin, Lim Kok Boon, Woon Tien Wei, Jennifer Teo. P-10 in the end: Cheong Kah Kit, Lee Sze Chin, Lim Kok Boon, Woon Tien Wei, Jennifer Teo.
[2] "The premises included the Show Room (multi-purpose space) and Food #3 (deli-bar and artwork of author Woon Tien Wei) on the ground floor... The second and third floors were semi-private spaces, which consisted of a shared office space, artist studios and the Back Room (multi-purpose space)." See Art and the City: Worlding the Discussion through a Critical Artscape, edited by Jason Luger & Julia Ren, "2 The collective moment", written by Jennifer Teo & Woon Tien Wei: Routledge Critical Studies in Urbanism and the City, p34, 2017.
[3] See the letter: sosbukitbrown.wordpress.com/action/sign-our-petition/(Retrieved on 7th September, 2020)
[4] "As curator and art critic Okwui Enwezor pointed out, collectivity and collaborative practices generate critique and question the modernist reification of the artist as an autonomous individual within modernist art (Enwezor, 2006). He raised three issues which problematise collectivity within modernism. The first is the issue of the authenticity of a work of art, as collective work complicates modernism’s idealisation of the artwork as the unique object of individual creativity. Second, as collectivity is often a response to crisis, the nature of collectivity often extends into the political horizon. This tends to give collective work a social rather than artistic quality. Hence, collectivity is often seen to be ‘essentially political in orientation with minimal artistic instrumentality’, challenging modernist formalism’s insistence on the primacy of the artwork. Third, collectivity can also be understood as a critique of the reification of art and the commodification of the artist. Under the operative conditions of capitalism, the loss of the individual artist is undesired, thus collectivity inherently rejects capitalism, and capitalism rejects collectivity.” See Art and the City: Worlding the Discussion through a Critical Artscape, edited by Jason Luger & Julia Ren, "2 The collective moment", written by Jennifer Teo & Woon Tien Wei: Routledge Critical Studies in Urbanism and the City, p31; 2017.
See Also
Post-Museum
Bukit Brown Index #132: Triptych of the Unseen, 2018